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Jigs

Jigs are Dances, common in Scotland, Northern England in the 16th and 17th centuries and later Ireland, and also the type of tune that goes with them.

There are essentially two kinds of jig - those which count the quick eigth notes in triplets (1,2,3 ....) and those which count the emphasised beats, 1 per triplet. In reality, only the former are true jigs.  

The characteristic of the tunes is that they are in 6/8 time which is arranged as two groups of three eighth notes per bar and follows the pattern 1,2,3 2,2,3. This form is commonly known as the Double Jig.

A Single Jig is similar (6/8 time which is arranged as two groups of three eighth notes per bar) but often follows the pattern 1 and 2 2 and 2 i.e. a quarter note followed by an eighth note in each group. The Slide is often confused with a Single Jig and may be written in 6/8 or 12/8, either way, it is counted as 1 and 2 2 and 2 or 1 and 2 2 and 2 3 and 2 4 and 2. The single jig is more akin to a Hornpipe or a Fling. Examples of true Single Jigs are Hag at the Churn and Off She Goes

A Slip Jig is similar to a Double Jig except that it is in 9/8 time arranged as three groups of three eighth notes per bar and follows the pattern 1,2,3 2,2,3 3,2,3.

The Jig time (6/8) is found in music and dance throughout Europe for example the Sbrando, Farandole and Tarantella